Welcome to O’Mordah’s World

Discussions that could help writers improve their writing skills from the 55 year veteran journalist, writer, and novelist Sean Patrick O’Mordha.

The Chamber of Smoke

Lonnie stepped onto the large, covered front porch overlooking a long meadow and mountains beyond wishing he were back in juvenile hall. So began week two of his 24/7 solitary confinement. It wasn’t his fault getting into trouble. The guys got bored and thought to brighten a stupid… Read more »

Colorizing Characters

Whether animate or inanimate, characters carry the plot to its conclusion. How an author presents these characters is the reason for spending so much time discussing them. It is important to know not only what they are and their role but who they are and why they behave… Read more »

The Pitcher Plants

As the door chimes faded, two men in Brooks Brothers suits waited on the tiled entrance. Behind them a teenage boy clad in a badly soiled T-shirt and torn jeans wedged between two police officers. “Good day, Sir, I’m Detective Azoris. This is Detective Salnave,” one explained, displaying… Read more »

Revise – Revise – Revise again

“What’s a rewrite?” Tom Clancy quipped at a recent conference. “I write them pretty much the way you guys read them and I turn in a fairly clean product.” Clancy feels he is the exception to the rule although I’ve seen a fair share of places his story needed… Read more »

Good Boy – Dead Boy

A Short Who-dunnit by Sean Patrick O’Mordha * Small, rural towns are notorious for knowing what’s going on with their neighbors. The smaller and further removed from “the big city,” the more people know as if living in the same house. Secrets carried on the winds of gossip… Read more »

Copyright — Explained

From time to time the subject of copyright law comes up either as a direct question or within an online conversation. Yes, I have a degree in Constitutional Law. Yes, I served as a special prosecutor for the US Government. I know criminal law, not copyright law. I am familiar… Read more »

Physical Love

Helpful information when writing love scenes (in and out of the bedroom)

Staying in Love

This is the third post about love and lust. When writing about the relationship of individuals, showing some of these events will help your story ring true.

Rule Makers Rankle

One thing that rankles my muse are writers who think their way is the only way because they’ve sold a few books. The results are all these “6 Ways to do this,” or 8 Ways to do that.” Here is an example. “10 things you should watch out… Read more »

Photo Prompts

Depending on the length of your work, when creating characters, there are a lot of things that should be added to the physical description—things beyond the usual hair and eye color, height and weight, and clothes. For now, I write earth-bound characters, but what follows can be tailored… Read more »

All in a Word

When first entering the field of professional writing in 1961 as a newspaper reporter, the reading level of Americans was 5th grade, and that’s how we crafted a story. In the ensuing fifty-six years it hasn’t gotten much better. National statistics are rather glum. Currently . . …. Read more »

From Where You Stand – POV

Think of your plot as a stream, your characters are in boats carried downstream by the current. The spectators are your readers, and the play-by-play announcer is . . .? How the action is called depends on the perspective, or the point of view of the person hired… Read more »

Paint Them Real

The main job of a writer is to create characters with whom the reader can relate using the only tool available—words. We have all experienced the sights and feel of emotions which we should  be able to convey in order to connect that bond between reader and character…. Read more »

The Little Things

When writing your story, the big holidays like Christmas or Mardi Gras sometimes slip in, but there are a whole lot more little things, if taken into consideration, could enhance the plot—either adding color, tension, relief, opportunity for action, or become a hindrance. Theses little things are often overlooked which… Read more »